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Ryan Singer

Head of Product Strategy, Basecamp

Aug 3, 2018

Analytics apps don't tell you much about usage behavior. You might be able to see how many users performed an event, or how many times they did it. But none of the analytics packages out there are good at showing you how often people do things. Are they using to-dos once a week? Every day? Only signing into the app once a month but happily paying for years?

Time matters. You can't understand usage without time. So I tried exploring time series as a way to view usage data. The problem is, it's a lot of data. It's easy to count how many users have done something or not. The result is just a number: x%. How do you count how many users have a similar pattern of behavior over time?

The other challenge is intuition. You might get some kind of statistical answer to these questions. But does that deepen your understanding about the behavior? I've wanted a way to see the behaviors directly.

To that end I've been exploring ways to view time series data on user behaviors one by one and also in clusters.

Visualizing usage

Sometimes you're totally in the dark about a feature. Is it used at all? By how many people? How much and how often? A single longitudinal graph can illuminate. Here's a look at usage after launch of the Hill Chart feature. Each row is one of about 5,000 people who've used the feature at least once. The chart shows the intensity, frequency, and scale of each behavior.

Hill Chart usage graph

Clustering to find a specific usage pattern

Sometimes you want to know how many customers fit a specific behavior -- like heavy daily usage. Clustering can help. Here we've taken all usage events from iOS users in a three week period, filtered by some account-level criteria, and clustered with k-Means. The clusters are shown through examples (the many colored lines represent individual acccounts) and through distributions (the histograms at the bottom). A technique like this allows us to recruit customers by frequency of usage for qualitative interviews.

Clusters of usage

Exploring with dimensional reduction

Here longitudinal usage data is dimensionally reduced via t-SNE (a kind of principal component analysis). Regions of the reduced space are selected with crosshairs and the behaviors within that region plotted below.

In this example we've found a region of 'usage space' where customers use their phone more frequently than the desktop app.

Browsing tSNE clusters
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